Friday, August 24, 2012

cream scones


I had half a carton of heavy cream in the fridge. Although I was tempted just to pour it over cereal, I decided to bake it into something. I'm glad I did, I'd choose these scones over cereal any day.


These scones are all over the internet -- and I can see why. They are moist, tender, and a cinch to make.


For the longest time, I did not like scones. I thought they were quite boring compared to fluffy muffins and buttery pastries. Coffee shop scones often resemble heavy, dry hockey pucks. These scones are different. And although they are simple, there is nothing borning about them.

Because this recipe uses heavy cream instead of butter, there is no need to whip out the food processor, or crumble butter with your fingers. With a quick stir of a fork, the scones are nearly done. They go into the oven looking like sad, little bricks, yet emerge as lofty scones with a sweet, golden crust.

Hot from the oven, these scones melt in your mouth. I left mine plain, simply brushing them with melted butter. They would be wonderful sprinkled with raw sugar for some added crunch, or with dried fruits, nuts, or chocolate mixed into the dough. My family is not a fan of the traditional raisins and currents, but I think that dried blueberries or apricots would be a hit.


Of course, these go wonderfully with your favorite jam or honey -- and they reheat beautifully.

What do you like in your scones?

With love,
Erica


Makes 12 scones (recipe halves nicely)

Ingredients
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 Tbsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 c. sugar1
1 1/4 c. heavy cream (perhaps a bit more)
optional: 3/4 c. dried fruit, nuts, or chocolate chips

Glaze
3 Tbsp. butter, melted
2 Tbsp. sugar
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Use an ungreased baking sheet.
Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar in a bowl, stirring with a fork to mix well. Add the dried fruit. Still using a fork, stir in the cream and mix until the dough holds together in a rough mass (the dough will be quite sticky; drizzle in a bit more cream if it seems too dry).
Lightly flour a board and transfer the dough to it. Knead the dough eight or nine times. Pat into a circle about 10 inches round. For the glaze, spread the butter over the top and sides of the circle of dough and sprinkle the sugar on top. Cut the circle into 12 wedges and place each piece on the baking sheet, allowing about an inch between pieces.
Bake for about 15 minutes, or until golden brown.


Adapted from The Breakfast Book by Marion Cunningham

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